News

2019

January

He was a civil rights activist and academic.

The son of a Native American who taught at an all-black college.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has selected Mónica Gutiérrez, a second-year ASU PhD student in social work, as a Health Policy Research Scholar.

Excavations in Mexico recently unearthed the first known temple dedicated to Xipe Totec, a god of the ancient Popoloca people who was associated with fertility and regeneration.

Anxious mothers may pass the stress hormone cortisol on to their babies through breast milk — but how does it affect infant development?

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Arizona State University's Tempe campus, the Archaeological Chemistry Laboratory analyzes samples from across the globe — such as plants, bones, dirt, textiles and

2018

December

Researchers recently announced the discovery of a previously unknown, ancient strain of the plague, which they found in the bones of a Swedish woman who was buried 5,000 years ago.

The electric atmosphere of the holiday season often shines a bright light on feelings of togetherness, intimacy and the state of coupledom in festive surroundings.

The study of religion is becoming more prominent as countries around the world continue to connect with one another.

A hit comedy series that helped to shape the image of the modern-day woman has been adopted into a gender studies class at Arizona State University.

Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. 

A young American man was recently killed by the indigenous inhabitants of North Sentinel Island — one of the few uncontacted human groups on the planet, known to be violent towards intruders — whil

You’re a human and you need food. What do you do?

In the late 1990s, the University of Pennsylvania had a problem: The neighborhood surrounding the university was unsafe.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2018 commencement. 

November

Social and behavioral science has a bias problem, argues Arizona State University Professor Daniel Hruschka in The Conversation.

By tracing the growth lines in adolescent Neanderthal teeth — which leave a record like tree rings — researchers gained fascinating insights into Neanderthal childhood.

Every year at Arizona State University, one program works to bring students from different universities and even countries together to solve real-world problems, connect with internationally renown

At first glance, you might think Arizona State University grad student Abby Goff is in need of a sweater.

Wildfires have a more damaging and lasting effect on poor and minority communities, according to a new study recently outlined in The New York Times.

The near-term future of Earth is one of a warming planet, as urban expansion and greenhouse gas emissions stoke the effects of climate change. Current climate projections show that in U.S.

“Oh, I’d be interested in a course like that!”

There is a problem with the set of tools social scientists use to study human behavior.

October

Three accomplished individuals are being recognized for bringing honor to their alma mater, Arizona State University.

Imagine a renaissance city where revolutionary ideas in urban planning, politics, economy, ecology and the arts all arose at the same time, creating a high standard of living that was largely equit

In 1776, when members of the Second Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia to sign a document declaring the Thirteen Colonies’ independence from the Kingdom of Gre

Most archaeological fieldwork in the U.S. is federally mandated for historic preservation.

Things we learned at the first day of the Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting:

In the Maya city of Copán lies a crypt holding the remains of 16 jaguars and pumas.

Why and when did humans begin to rely on culturally transmitted information? Does culture allow humans to adapt to a wide range of ecological habitats?

"You're going to need a bigger boat."

"We're not in Kansas anymore."

"I'll have what she's having."

"Go ahead, make my day."

September

It’s not easy being a kid, especially in middle school (sixth and seventh grade), when fitting in and finding place among your peers can be daunting.

Think about where you are right now. Your office chair, your living room couch, your spot of shady sidewalk. The land under your feet has a story to tell.

Many people use Yelp to find a good place to eat or a trusted mechanic, but in a new study researchers delved deep into the popular online review site to better understand American child care from

New research by an Arizona State University professor shows that some methods of addressing security in schools may actually make students feel less safe.

Fear of being eaten by a wild animal is our most ancient emotion.

Sarah Jones, a doctoral candidate in ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication, is one of 100 women in the U.S.

Every day, black people have to navigate in “white spaces,” dispelling stereotypes and convincing everyone that they’re worthy.

August

The granddaughter of a man who served as the warden of Angola, the Louisiana State Penitentiary sometimes referred to as “the Alcatraz of the South,” Leah Sarat sees the irony in helming a project

Mary Romero, a professor in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University, recently presented her research at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.

Kristin Mickelson of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences in Arizona State University's New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, along with Claudia Chambers from Dignity He

Recent and ongoing changes to U.S.

Amy Pennar, a former Arizona State University doctoral student in family and human development at the T.

A Hollywood director fired for comments tweeted a decade ago.

The last few weeks of summer are a prime time to hit the road and enjoy the wilderness, whether it’s hiking, biking, rafting or camping.

In the Iron Age stone tower of Cairns Broch in Orkney, Scotland, archaeologists found a 2000-year-old wooden bowl, along with 20 perfectly preserved strands of human hair.

July

How did small, isolated groups of ancient humans come to form complex societies?

A new study on ancient cultures in Peru has found the most effective growth strategy for leaders of some early city-states was

While the policies for separating children from their parents or guardians at the U.S.-Mexico border have recently changed, there are still many concerns about the short- and long-term effects suff

Most employees know that relationships with their co-workers are important, but it’s likely not many realize that they also think of their company as a person.

But they do.

Craig Calhoun, the world-renowned social scientist and former director and president of the London School of Economics and Political Science, has joined Arizona State University as University Profe

June

With more than 2,000 children currently separated from their parents as a result of recent border policies, the U.S. is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis.

Andres Munoz, a doctoral student in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, studies cooperation from an evolutionary perspective and wh

It’s a disclaimer that echoes passionately through the lecture halls of every beginning archaeology course: It’s not like the Indiana Jones movies!

Keith Kintigh has seen the future of archaeology — and it’s not what you might expect.

The story of water in Arizona is as long and complex as the multibiomed state itself, but as it snakes its way through the years — from the Pima settling on the banks of the Gila River to Charles T

May

The California clapper rail is a chicken-sized bird with slender legs, brown feathers and a long beak. It makes its home in the salt marshes of the San Francisco Bay.

Roughly 80 percent of the 62,000 refugees who have come to live in Arizona since the

“ASU has the spirit of America in it,” says Khashayar “Shay” Khatiri, a recent graduate of the School of Politics and Global Studies and the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studie

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month is celebrated at Arizona State University in April and nationally in May, but in the Asian Pacific American Studie

April

DNA — since the world first saw its iconic double helix structure in 1953, it has given scientists a treasure trove of insights into human health and uniqueness.

All over the world, archaeologists are constantly collecting data.

Across the world of mammals, teeth come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

The numbers are in: 46,000 square feet, 40 professional staff, three advising hubs and one career center.

On Tuesday, May 8, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities

March

On one of the most memorable days of her life, Kaye Reed found herself holding the jawbone of an ancestor who lived 2.8 million years ago.

In early March, the Center for Global Health in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change hosted this year’s Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) international conference, with participa

Arizona has a rich historical legacy, and there’s no better time to appreciate it than in March, when temperate weather combines with opportunity for adventure during Arizona Archaeology and Herita

In the 1960s, an archaeologist named René Millon began mapping the ancient city of Teotihuacan in Mexico.

Imagine a year in Africa when summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter.

Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO), a research unit of the Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society, has once a

From stately cruise ships to Olympic host cities, recent headline-grabbing outbreaks prove that norovirus — an incapacitating and vaccine-less stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea — can st

Immigration uncertainty is causing headaches — literally — for millions of Latino parents across the country, regardless of their legal status.

February

“A society is defined not only by what it creates, but what it refuses to destroy,” environmentalist John Sawhill said.

A new demographic of never-married women in their 40s who have children has emerged in recent years, in sharp contrast to traditional family models like the so-called "nuclear family."

A 2,000-year-old handprint changed the course of Kelly Knudson’s life.

What makes humans special? It's a question mankind has puzzled over for centuries.

It’s easy to watch the evening news and assume Homo sapiens is one of the most recalcitrant species on the planet.

Arizona State University researcher Kevin Langergraber knows nearly 200 chimpanzees of the Ngogo community by sight and by name — Jackso

It is not uncommon for students to crave a sense of place while attending college, especially when traveling away from their home to start their new journey.

January

Arizona State University’s Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics has surpassed Harvard in the Center for World University Rankings on fa

Women around the world have been excluded from many professions throughout history, including, until recently, city planning and management.

Social media can be extremely useful when you have something to shout from the rooftops — like, say, groundbreaking research — and indeed, many scholars regularly use it so.

T. Denny Sanford’s name is associated with major philanthropic gifts throughout the U.S.

Doing what's safe may be easy, but sometimes taking a chance can make all the difference.

Have you ever felt a deep, instant bond with a city? A place where the people, culture and even the architecture all seem to whisper, “This is where you belong”?

It is rare to find a career based on one’s passion, yet Arizona State University alumna Sambo ‘Bo’ Dul has found exactly that in her job as an attorney at Perkins Coie LLP.

2017

December

Adrienne Baldwin-White never expected to pursue a doctoral degree, much less become an academic.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2017 commencement.

On Tuesday, Dec.12, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, n

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2017 commencement.

November

Out on the far northwestern edge of the Valley, where the pavement turns to sand, is a place people have been visiting for 5,000 years.

Teotihuacan was once the largest and most influential city in the ancient new world. Yet its social structure seems to be more egalitarian than those in its fellow ancient cities.

Thanksgiving time finds many of us thinking back to our fondest food memories. But what if the meal that sticks out most in your mind doesn’t feature a turkey and pumpkin pie?

Thanksgiving brings us closer together, but our conversations across generations in a family can sometimes drive us farther apart.

Seven members of Arizona State University are among the 396 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a prestigious international scientific soc

October

Sports are embedded in college tradition, and no other time reminds us of this quite like Homecoming. But what do sports look like in other cultures?

Growing up in the cold Northeast, Paul Padegimas did not think much about what the desert could offer until he was looking at graduate programs.

Ever since his first visit to Arizona State University, alumnus Abraham Hamadeh knew it was the ideal place for him to study political science.

In his in his award-winning book "Ingenious Citizenship: Recrafting Democracy for Social Change," Arizona State University Professor Charles T.

September

Three Arizona State University professors were honored at the Victoria Foundation’s eighth annual Arizona Higher Education Awards ceremony for helping Latina/o youth pursue advanced degrees.

Last December, as other teens were looking forward to the holiday season and planning outings with friends and family, Houston-area high school student Brandy Vela was feeling so overwhelmed by onl

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and communication from the University of Southern California, Sarah Tracy did a short stint in public relations before deciding she wan

It’s official: Anthropology has gone high tech.

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have displaced scores of humans, many of whom have equally frightened pets.

ASU senior Monet Niesluchowski gave Phileas Fogg, the protagonist of Jules Verne’s classic adventure novel “Around the World in Eighty Days,” a run for his money this summer when she traveled to Ic

The flooding in Houston was exacerbated by how the city was built.

August

The Social Science Research Council’s InterAsia Program recently selected Britt Crow-Miller as an SSRC Transregional Research Junior Scholar fellow for the 2017-2

The ideals of a presidential candidate, the histories of persecuted peoples and the motives behind terror attacks are all things that can be better understood with a knowledge of the religions that

In 1994, three teenage boys were convicted of the murders of three 8-year-old boys in what would become known as the case of the West Memphis Three.

Alexander Avina grew up the son of undocumented Mexican migrants in California, constantly aware that at any moment his parents could be deported, leaving him and his siblings, all American-born, t

The threads of history are often found in the daily life of people, and Matthew Delmont has been exploring that theme.

July

As human beings, what drives us to higher levels of existence? Once we have satisfied the basics — food, shelter, a mate, children — then what?

Editor's note: This is part of our weeklong monsoon series; to read the first installation, "Gully washers and boulder rollers: How monsoons shape the desert," 

Imagine you’re on a 28-mile journey that takes you across icy rivers and up steep jungle trails.

Arizona State University alumnus Matt Shindell found a way to bring all his interests together in a career many would rank high on their list of dream jobs: curating a collection at the Smithsonian

June

Darien Keane will spend the month of July halfway across the world teaching communication to benefit students of another country.

Bioarchaeology is a young but quickly growing field that studies how people from the past lived and died, and is most often described as a combination of biological anthropology, archaeology and so

The Arizona Debate Institute, hosted by Arizona State University, is the largest summer debate institute for college students in the nation.

When male chimpanzees of the world’s largest known troop patrol the boundaries of their territory in Ngogo, Uganda, they walk silently in single file.

Doctoral student Ashley Wheeler believes in the importance of protecting cultural world heritage.

Gina Woodall, a senior lecturer in the School of Politics and Global Studies, bleeds maroon and gold.

Amy Rajnisz was that one student in high school who could never answer the question: "What do you want to be when you grow up?"

Arizona State University alumnus Thom Brooks has garnered international acclaim for his work on ethics, public policy, law and politics.

May

They have what most would want — affluent upwardly mobile parents, living in comfortable homes in the suburbs, going to an elite high school and being groomed for the nation’s best colleges.